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The “See Food Diet” May Be a Real Thing

July 06, 2018

The “See Food Diet” May Be a Real Thing

The “See Food Diet” May Be a Real Thing

Most of us have heard the joke over the years about the “see food diet” where someone eats whatever he or she sees.  While most jokes contain at least some hint of truth or perceived truth on the part of the teller, it turns out that the joke about the see food diet may be onto something.  A recent study suggests that what’s out there and visible to us could not only have an effect on what we eat, but also how much we weigh and resulting aspects of our lifestyle.

About the Study

Researchers at Cornell University completed the study of food visibility and eating habits and preferences.  A link to an abstract of the study can be found here.  Specifically, the researchers looked at photographs taken of 210 kitchens in Syracuse, New York after taking and looking at more than 500 photographs of kitchens across the country.  The food that was visible in the kitchens was recorded and those kitchens were matched with the height and weight of the adults in those homes.  The results were somewhat surprising.  For instance:

  1. 52.7 percent of people of normal weight had fresh fruit on their countertops.
  2. Only 37.4 percent of obese subjects had fruit out and visibly available.
  3. 7.4 percent of people of normal weight had soda visible in their kitchens.
  4. 17.4 percent of obese subjects had soda out and visible.
  5. Women who kept soda out and visible weighed more than 20 pounds more than women who did not.
  6. Women who kept breakfast cereal out on the counter weighed approximately 20 pounds more than those who did not.
  7. Leaving candy on the counter led to men weighing nearly 20 pounds more than their counterparts.
  8. Leaving fruit on the counter led to women weighing an average of 15 pounds less than their fruit-free counterparts.

As is stated openly by the researchers, this information is more correlational than causational, but it has been seen as interesting to those in the food professions. 

What Could This Mean?

Perhaps we are what we eat, and we eat what we see.  While that’s a bit of a leap from the results of this study, this information does seem to suggest that if we have unhealthy snacks ready and easily available, we may be more likely to eat them.  This could also mean that the opposite is true.  Therefore, perhaps it would be wise to keep some healthy and smart snacks around for those times when hunger strikes and it isn’t yet time for a meal. 

Family Health Market has been providing relatively healthy and smart snacks to people all over the place for the past several years.  All you need to do to replace junk food with healthier alternatives is speak to one of our knowledgeable staff and they will recommend some solid snacking options for yourself and your family.





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